Egyptian pyramids

Why were the pyramids made? It is said, they were built especially for the Pharaohs. The ruler needed certain things to take with him after transition. Because of religious beliefs, many treasures were added deep inside so that after he died and was mummified, he would be able to use them in the afterlife. The pharaohs were the political and religious leaders of ancient Egypt.

But, there was another if not main purpose to the pyramids. They were actually places of study and mystical initiation. The great pyramids of Giza were most sacred in the eyes of initiates who sought to learn the mysteries.

Only devout sincere students, who displayed a deep desire for knowledge and met certain tests or criteria were considered worthy of being inducted into these mysteries, the roots of the original ancient mystery schools.

It’s still perplexing to Egyptology researchers how the Egyptians actually built their pyramids. It has been said that thousands of slaves would push each huge individually cut limestone block up a ramp. Extraterrestrials, anyone?

Because it took over twenty years to build each pyramid, Pharaohs usually had them start building one right away as soon as they assumed power. There are over one hundred and thirty pyramids in Egypt.

There were fake chambers inside the pyramids to fool grave robbers. But, eventually in time most pyramids were broken into anyway and robbed of their treasure

What intrigues me the most is this mysteriousness feeling I get about the ancient pyramids. It may seem a bit weird or odd, but I feel an emitted vibration, drawing power or magnetism radiating from those structures. Really.

If you are old enough, you will remember the ‘pyramid power’ craze (way back when.) It seems, as soon as they think they’ve discovered everything about the pyramids possible, they find one more hidden chamber. Amazing.

Akhenaten was the famous monotheistic pharaoh who said only ‘one god’ existed; Aten the solar deity or disc of the sun. He ordered other Egyptian deities names and images to be eliminated or defaced. This caused turmoil in the society where citizens and priests had long practiced old polytheistic beliefs.

Akhenaten ruled with his wife Nefertiti. His reign lasted seventeen years until he died. He was father of king Tut, who when became pharaoh himself (at only age nine or ten!) eventually reopened the old religious temples his father had closed thereby restoring polytheism in Egypt.

ankh, symbol of life, egyptian

‘Ankh the ancient Egyptian symbol of life’

The Ankh image became well-known in the US because of the ‘new age’ movement in the 1960’s. Cool.

What struck me vividly touching my heart was how much the ancient Egyptians adored their house cats when alive and after they passed away.

Egyptian cats were considered ‘sacred’. Many cats received the same mummification and care as humans in that time period. I too love my cats that much. Forgive me, but I think I may even ‘worship’ the ground they walk on. They are such wonderful companions and friends.

Egyptian cats were also highly valued for keeping the rodent population in check and killing poisonous snakes such as the Cobra. I imagine they must have also caught mice, and that no bug (cockroaches?) in any home escaped their watchful eyes.

Traditionally, I was always a dog lover. Now, I love both. Go figure. I think that as I aged, I became more compassionate toward all living things. My heart simply opened up wide-r.

I never was such a devout cat lover as I am now. I don’t know what happened me. I must’ve just fallen in love; hook, line and sinker for these lovely feline beauties. There was a big change within me that took place. Cat lovers unite!

 

 

 

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About Steven Humphreys

I live in sunny California with my beautiful wife, three wonderful cats and very handsome dog! I write a lot these days about different subjects I hope you will find interesting and informative. Thanks for your interest. Read more 'about me' on this site. Thanks for visiting!
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